Enterprise Marketing for the Category Leader

by Jay Joyce, President/Chief Digital Officer - Mar 05, 2019

The B2B market in every product and service category is tight and competitive across the board. There is a race to adopt emerging technologies to keep customers engaged and their business accounts intact. It's just plain tough to be a category leader in an age of technology transformation and fickle customer loyalty. So how do businesses maintain or become a category leader?

Posting on LinkedIn and writing a blog aren't cutting it any longer. Everybody is doing that times ten. You need a larger impactful solution...and not just another band-aid. What is a next-level impact that can help the B2B marketing effort at the enterprise (total business) level?

First let's define that "enterprise" means either a small business enterprise (under 250 employees) or a large business enterprise (over 250 employees). We believe that businesses should be looking at the entire enterprise, not just departments or silos. Enterprise marketing is the how the enterprise adopts programs across the board to drive superior customer experiences and brand story consistency. Once any size business or enterprise adopts a customer-first culture, the transformation into technology efficiencies and enterprise level marketing can ease into place.

The Category Leader Embraces Enterprise Marketing

We all want to work, to buy and to "be like" the category leaders. It seems like they are the trendsetters and the early adopters. People and companies scramble to understand and to emulate their patterns of success. But how do they do it? How can category leaders seem to innovate and to reinvent before our eyes? And so often?

Enterprise marketing addresses the entire enterprise, not just one initiative or campaign or one department. It's the entire enterprise that takes customers on a customer journey.

It's about the customer experience across your entire enterprise.

Does your company's customer experience begin and end with the sales department? Or with customer service? Your entire culture should be focused on creating an exceptional customer experience from top to bottom and left to right. Look inside each department and see how your customers interact with the people, their data or some communications. Where are you missing the opportunity to turn a negative into a positive? Where can you strengthen the customer relationship inside each department? Begin to improve your internal culture to one that embraces exceptional customer experiences and it will move outward across your enterprise.

Enterprise marketing through digital transformation communications with The Idea People TIP digital in Charlotte NC.

Everybody sings from the same sheet of music.

Somehow every individual inside the category leading enterprises know and understand the mission of the company and how they are supposed to respond and to treat customers. Imagine that? What a world of peace and harmony, right? In reality, it is so difficult because it involves people and changing their habits. But it works like magic when it works. Look at the Apple store, Nordstrom Department Store, GEICO insurance claims and Chick-fil-A. Those brands have tangible customer experiences that every single worker embraces and portrays when a customer interacts with them...whether on the phone or in person. Think about it.

No more silos.

You can't be a category leader inside a silo. Break those down across the enterprise. Sales talks to everybody, and everybody talks to sales. The internal culture and mission is about the enterprise...and the enterprise is about building a better customer experience. How can your entire company build a customer experience platform that focuses all attention on the customer? You can do it regardless of the size of your company.

Buy-in from the C-suite and ownership.

Category leaders have owners and C-suite members that are enterprise-level adopters of transformation and marketing. Being a category leader through embracing enterprise marketing programs starts at the top and spreads evenly across every team member and department. CEO and entrepreneur Marcus Lemonis says, "We're not going to wake up every morning wondering if we have a job; we're going to wake up every morning wondering how many jobs we have to do today." That's genius enterprise-level philosophy from the top leadership.

Treating marketing tools and content with an enterprise force.

Now that we have the internal culture talking and moving toward the same goal of creating exceptional customer experiences, we can begin to create marketing strategies that leverage this momentum externally toward existing and new customers. After all, you're a category leader now. The enterprise marketing strategy is the magic road map. And flexibility of turning and deviating when things don't feel or play right gives you incredible leverage. Remember, everybody is moving forward together as one enterprise with no silos...so turning quickly on strategy should be easy. Responding to market stressors or customer demands should be within the wheelhouse of quick solutions.

Ok. We still have the details of the actual marketing strategies to figure out, but that's where we can help.

Our team at TIP will present the details of the marketing strategies with content calendars, conversion goals, suggested new parallel markets, new platform ideas and all of the nuts and bolts of enterprise marketing.

But the larger aspects of enterprise marketing are the key components of good digital transformation communications. Increasing customer experiences will help a company either maintain category leadership or uncover new category leadership.

We can help you at the enterprise level with digital transformation and customer experience enterprise marketing. Call our president, Jay Joyce, at 704-398-4437 or email jay@theideapeople.com. If you have exceptional products or an exceptional service, we can help you transform your internal culture to increase customer value by leveraging technology at the enterprise level.

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